Will County, IL Spanish Speaking Attorneys

Will County, IL Spanish Speaking Hispanic Real Estate Transaction Attorneys

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Illinois real estate law comes with a long list of potential problems. Whether residential or commercial, buying, selling or leasing, new construction or renovation, real estate businesses can generate legal problems.

When problems arise, or you want to make sure they do not occur, talking to a real estate expert attorney from our Illinois office and other offices can be helpful.

Bienes Raíces Residenciales

In addition to providing representation during closing, we can prepare and negotiate contracts, review transaction documents, communicate with the other party’s Illinois property transaction attorney and help resolve issues at closing.

Bienes Raíces Comerciales

Commercial leases can involve considerable amounts of money, long terms and major obligations. We have experience in representing both landlords and tenants, and we can advise and assist in negotiating important lease terms such as security deposit, property improvements, sublease and lease, lease renewals and tax assignment , Insurance and maintenance costs.

 

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What Does A Real Estate Transaction Attorney Do?

what is a property law

Real estate attorneys deal with the many laws and practice areas associated with land ownership issues. For example, a commercial real estate attorney knows which laws apply to commercial transactions for construction/development projects (such as condo construction), or land use/zoning projects (such as subdividing a parcel of land for development), or real property issues (such as financing a large land purchase). Likewise, residential real estate lawyers help you buy a home, or prevent you from losing your home in foreclosure. They also know how residential tenancy laws work and can advise you of your rights as a tenant. With so many types of real estate attorneys, it is important to find a specialist who does the work you need.

When To Call A Real Estate Transaction Lawyer

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What is the difference between a mortgage and a deed of trust?


A mortgage is a document that encumbers real property as security for the payment of a debt or other obligation. The term "mortgage" refers to the document that creates the lien on real estate and is recorded in the local office of deed records to provide notice of the lien secured by the creditor. The creditor or lender, also called either mortgagee (in a mortgage) or beneficiary (in a deed of trust), is the owner of the debt or other obligation secured by the mortgage. The debtor or borrower, also called the mortgagor (in a mortgage) or obligor (in a deed of trust), is the person or entity who owes the debt or other obligation secured by the mortgage and owns the real property which is the subject of the loan.


In almost all cases, the law of the state in which the property is located dictates whether a mortgage or deed of trust can be used. Although a deed of trust securing real property under a debt serves the same purpose and performs the same function as a mortgage, there are technical and substantive differences between the two. A deed of trust is executed by the debtor and property owner, to a disinterested third person identified as a trustee, who holds the ownership of the property in trust for the creditor; whereas, when a mortgage is used, title to the collateral remains in the debtor, and the mortgage creates a lien on the real estate in favor of the creditor. In some jurisdictions, the deed of trust enables the trustee to obtain possession of the real property without a foreclosure and sale, while others treat a deed of trust just like a mortgage. In the latter jurisdictions, the deed of trust is governed by the law applicable to mortgages. The deed of trust requires the trustee to reconvey the property back to the debtor when the debt has been paid in full. Assignment of the creditor’s interest does not result in a change of trustee; instead, only the note or other evidence of debt is transferred and the new owner of the loan acquires the prior lender’s beneficial interest in the trust.


What is commercial financing in general?


Financing a property is the standard method by which individuals and businesses can purchase residential and commercial real estate without the need to pay the full price in cash up front from their own accounts at the time of the purchase. Financing for non-residential real estate is generally obtained from a bank, insurance company or other institutional lender to provide funds for the acquisition, development, and operation of a commercial real estate venture. Commercial financing loans are secured primarily by real estate and related assets owned by the debtor. Assets used to collateralize commercial finance loans, aside from the real estate, may include fixtures, equipment, bank and/or trade accounts, receivables, inventory, general intangibles, and supplies. Documents evidencing and securing the loan typically include: loan agreements, promissory notes, mortgages or deeds of trust, assignments of rents and leases, financing statements, environmental indemnity agreements, guaranties, subordination, non-disturbance and attornment agreements, estoppel certificates, and other ancillary documents.

Real Estate Transaction Lawyer For Veterans

lawyer for real estate

Do you need an experienced Attorney for a Real Estate matter located in Cook County or one of the surrounding counties in Illinois?


Whether your legal matter is a landlord-tenant dispute, relating to the buying or selling of real estate, a boundary dispute with a neighbor, or something else, you need an experienced local attorney who is familiar with the laws of Illinois, but also with real estate-specific rules and regulations on the county and municipal level.


Furthermore, in today's challenging economic times, real estate laws are changing rapidly as governmental entities attempt to help distressed homeowners, landlords and businesses.


Your lawyer needs to stay informed about all of the changes in the law in order to ensure that you get the most reliable advice and the best possible outcome for your legal issue. Our friendly, knowledgeable staff of referral counselors can help you find an experienced real estate lawyer who is right for you.


Meeting the American Bar Association's Standards for Lawyer Referral, our service has among the highest experience requirements for its real estate attorneys in the entire nation.


If you'd like to get a referral online right now, get started by clicking on the link below that best describes the type of real estate attorney you need for your legal issue:


 



  • Real Estate - Commercial (real estate transactions involving contracts and closings for commercial properties, including apartment buildings with 6 or more units; formation of partnerships, joint ventures and other real estate entities; leasing of office, retail, industrial properties or apartment buildings with 6 or more units; mortgage loan financing matters)

  • Real Estate - Litigation (litigation on purchase and sale contract disputes or warranty matters; mechanics liens; foreclosures; landlord-tenant disputes involving litigation)

  • Real Estate - Residential (real estate transactions involving contracts and closings for residential properties, including condominiums; representation of condominium owners or associations; leases on apartment buildings with less than 6 units);

  • Real Estate - Tax (matters relating to real estate or property tax, including appeals of taxes and assessments at county and township levels; appraisal of properties for taxation purposes)

  • Zoning Law (pertains to local zoning ordinances, regulations and decisions; appeals of zoning decisions, changes or denials; requests for zoning changes; special use permits; land use planning; planned unit development; and building use conversions which conflict with zoning laws or regulations)

  • Condemnation (matters relating to the taking of real property by governmental entities through eminent domain or condemnation, including compensation related to government taking of property).